Archive: 2019

1
Infrastructure Disputes: What the Future Holds For Us
2
K&L Gates Named a “Go-To Construction Law Firm”
3
An Overview of Pennsylvania’s New Arbitration Law
4
What’s in a Name? Recent Case Determines Using a Trading Name Does Not Invalidate a Notice of Adjudication
5
K&L Gates Recognized Among Top Five Construction Law Firms by Construction Executive
6
PRACTICAL COMPLETION: CLARIFYING A “TRIFLING” TOPIC
7
NEC4 Update – May 2019
8
Overview and Q&A: Construction and Projects in Qatar
9
Update: Collateral Warranties in Qatar
10
Take Care When Drafting Definitions of “Practical Completion”

Infrastructure Disputes: What the Future Holds For Us

On 12 September 2019, Matthew Smith and Nita Mistry spoke on a panel at CIArb’s Infrastructure Disputes Conference.

Among the topics covered, Matthew discussed the challenges and opportunities relating to infrastructure mega project management, and Nita concentrated her remarks on arbitration proceedings arising out of mega projects.

Please click here for full coverage of their panel.

K&L Gates Named a “Go-To Construction Law Firm”

K&L Gates is pleased to have been named the “Best Firm to Handle the Construction Project of the Future” by Above the Law.

“The construction industry has been around for centuries, but that doesn’t mean it hasn’t adapted to the changing times. The Construction and Infrastructure Group at K&L Gates draws from vast past experience to focus on ensuring that construction projects are sustainable for the next generation. The firm’s lawyers specialize in niche areas like integrating technology and IP into construction projects and incorporating clean energy and green initiatives. When you’re planning a construction project for a better tomorrow, K&L Gates is thinking ahead.”

For the full article, please click here.

An Overview of Pennsylvania’s New Arbitration Law

By Richard F. Paciaroni and Justin N. Leonelli

Effective July 1, 2019, Pennsylvania has joined 20 other states in adopting the Revised Uniform Arbitration Act (RUAA) as the most current law governing agreements to arbitrate in Pennsylvania. The RUAA was originally promulgated by the Uniform Law Commission in 2000, which replaced the original Uniform Arbitration Act (UAA) enacted by the Commission in 1956. Recognizing the need to replace an outdated UAA, Pennsylvania adopted the RUAA as a more thorough and robust arbitration law to meet the needs of modern disputes. Now, the RUAA provides specific guidance on various aspects of arbitration, including but not limited to the initiation of arbitration proceedings, impartiality of arbitrators, arbitrator immunity, discovery proceedings, and sanctions.

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What’s in a Name? Recent Case Determines Using a Trading Name Does Not Invalidate a Notice of Adjudication

By Nita Mistry and Victoire Courtenay

Recently, in the case of MG Scaffolding (Oxford) Ltd v Palmloch Ltd [2019] EWHC 1787 (TCC), the Technology and Construction Court (“TCC”) held that the adjudicator did not lack jurisdiction and the notice of adjudication was valid, in circumstances where the adjudication was commenced and pursued against the responding party’s trading name.

The adjudication was commenced by MG Scaffolding (Oxford) Limited (“MGS”) against “MCR Property Group” (“MCRPG”). This was in fact a trading name for the correct contractual counterparty called Palmloch Ltd (“Palmloch”).

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K&L Gates Recognized Among Top Five Construction Law Firms by Construction Executive

Washington, D.C. – Construction news outlet Construction Executive has recognized K&L Gates LLP among the top five firms in the publication’s inaugural rankings of the 50 leading law firms throughout the United States with dedicated construction practices. With nearly 150 lawyers in its construction practice, K&L Gates also ranks first among included firms by number of construction lawyers.

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PRACTICAL COMPLETION: CLARIFYING A “TRIFLING” TOPIC

By: Kevin Greene and Kirin Giblin

In the recent case of Mears v Costplan [2019] EWCA Civ 502, the Court of Appeal provided significant clarity as to how courts should interpret the widely used but seldom defined term, “practical completion” in the context of construction contracts. In essence, it was held that practical completion should only be prevented by patent defects (i.e. those that can be discovered by reasonable inspection) where such defects are considered “more than trifling.”

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NEC4 Update – May 2019

By: Nicola J. Ellis and Charles D. Oliver

On 1 March 2019 the NEC published a revision to the NEC4 suite of contracts, first published in June 2017. Whilst generally focused on addressing typographical errors and/or terminology corrections, a more significant amendment has been made to clause 63.5 – a new clause introduced in NEC4 but subsequently critiqued for a lack of clarity.

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Overview and Q&A: Construction and Projects in Qatar

By Pawel Piotrowski, Matthew R. M. Walker and Amjad Hussain

The Q&A is part of the global guide to construction and projects. Areas covered include trends and significant deals, the main parties, procurement arrangements, transaction structures and corporate vehicles, financing projects, security and contractual protections required by funders, standard forms of contract, risk allocation, exclusion of liability, caps and force majeure. Also covered are material delays and variations, appointing and paying contractors, subcontractors, licences and consents, project insurance, labour laws, health and safety, environmental issues, corrupt business practices and bribery, bankruptcy and insolvency, public private partnerships (PPPs), dispute resolution, tax, the main construction organisations, and proposals for reform.

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Take Care When Drafting Definitions of “Practical Completion”

By Kevin Greene and Daniel R. Cartmell, K&L Gates, London

The December 2018 decision in University of Warwick v Balfour Beatty Group Ltd [2018] EWHC 3230 (TCC) provides valuable insight into how courts could interpret “Practical Completion” – a central concept in most construction contracts, but one that often lacks clarity and/or definitional precision.

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